It’s harder to change driving habits than expected, survey finds therecord.com

The findings are revealed in a comprehensive transportation census conducted every five years for the Ministry of Transportation. It measures where people go, why and how they get there, based on a travel survey of almost 400,000 people across southern Ontario.

In Kitchener, Cambridge and Waterloo, residents aged 11 or older make just over one million trips on a typical weekday, the travel census found. They go to jobs or schools. They go shopping or run errands. They go out to entertain themselves.

This is consistent with other data showing Grand River Transit experienced the biggest drop in ridership in Ontario between 2013 and 2016. That’s been blamed on low gas prices, construction detours, a provincial transit downturn, changes in student housing, and greater use of school buses.


The Ministry of Transportation secured local findings by surveying 9,790 households representing 23,109 people in the fall of 2016 for what’s called the Transportation Tomorrow Survey. It’s billed as the largest travel survey ever undertaken anywhere.

The sample size, representing five per cent of local households, is expanded to estimate the full population, adjusted for age and gender using the 2016 census as a guide. Findings were recently made available to planners and researchers through an online portal.

The findings are revealed in a comprehensive transportation census conducted every five years for the Ministry of Transportation. It measures where people go, why and how they get there, based on a travel survey of almost 400,000 people across southern Ontario.

In Kitchener, Cambridge and Waterloo, residents aged 11 or older make just over one million trips on a typical weekday, the travel census found. They go to jobs or schools. They go shopping or run errands. They go out to entertain themselves.

This is consistent with other data showing Grand River Transit experienced the biggest drop in ridership in Ontario between 2013 and 2016. That’s been blamed on low gas prices, construction detours, a provincial transit downturn, changes in student housing, and greater use of school buses.

The Ministry of Transportation secured local findings by surveying 9,790 households representing 23,109 people in the fall of 2016 for what’s called the Transportation Tomorrow Survey. It’s billed as the largest travel survey ever undertaken anywhere.

The sample size, representing five per cent of local households, is expanded to estimate the full population, adjusted for age and gender using the 2016 census as a guide. Findings were recently made available to planners and researchers through an online portal.

The findings are revealed in a comprehensive transportation census conducted every five years for the Ministry of Transportation. It measures where people go, why and how they get there, based on a travel survey of almost 400,000 people across southern Ontario.

In Kitchener, Cambridge and Waterloo, residents aged 11 or older make just over one million trips on a typical weekday, the travel census found. They go to jobs or schools. They go shopping or run errands. They go out to entertain themselves.

This is consistent with other data showing Grand River Transit experienced the biggest drop in ridership in Ontario between 2013 and 2016. That’s been blamed on low gas prices, construction detours, a provincial transit downturn, changes in student housing, and greater use of school buses.

The Ministry of Transportation secured local findings by surveying 9,790 households representing 23,109 people in the fall of 2016 for what’s called the Transportation Tomorrow Survey. It’s billed as the largest travel survey ever undertaken anywhere.

The sample size, representing five per cent of local households, is expanded to estimate the full population, adjusted for age and gender using the 2016 census as a guide. Findings were recently made available to planners and researchers through an online portal.