Rf generation. the classic and modern gaming databases.

Folks on this site likely know the feeling; You and three ‘friends’ are in a heated Super Smash Bros. Melee when someone cries out, "My "R" button isn’t working! Hey guys, wait!" Or that heated Joust versus match with the controller that just doesn’t ‘flap’ as fast, or the time you were excited to show off your rare Sega CD Snatcher on one of the four days of the week that the drive tray doesn’t want to work…

If you are a retro gamer that plays as well as collects, you know the effort it takes to upkeep your library. Vintage video game collecting is like classic car collecting or pinball machine collecting; it’s more than just having space for the stuff and the ability to find and pay for the games and hardware.


If it is going to remain playable, there’s some know-how and some elbow grease that will become part of the hobby. From notorious controller wear and faulty optical drives, to analog drift and bad capacitors, every retro player/collector has to get comfortable with just how far down the rabbit hole they are going to go. Perhaps you are fortunate enough to have a passion for a console that seems immune to all but psyonic attacks (SNES, Game Boy Color) or maybe you’ve fallen for a glass snowflake (Famicom Disc System, a Turbo Duo with good sound), but either way there is always some basic maintenance needed.

With each passing year, my game collection grows, and with it my gaming backlog. I used to think I would eventually make time for all the games I wanted to play, but the older I get, the more my thinking changes. The most recent of these evolutions has been to start thinking about making some tough decisions. I’m starting to think I may have to let some games go, at least for the foreseeable future, in the interest of making it clear which games really matter to me. Part of the reason I find it daunting to hack away at my backlog is simple choice paralysis. So to help make those decisions and to cope with a certain level of resignation, I’ve decided not to make this yet another "oh whoa is me I’ll never get to my pile of shame" post, but to instead work through some kind of prioritization process. At the very least, I’m hoping that thinking through it will make me feel like I’m actually doing something about it. Also, maybe by doing this in a public forum it’ll motivate me to make time for some of the most egregious of these blank spots in my gaming history.

I’ve often talked about how I feel like I’m no longer the target audience for most game makers these days and how I’ve been more rapidly retreating into older generations of gaming to get the types of games I love most. One of the amazing side effects of the current state of gaming is that when games come out that appeal to me, they are quite often niche games or passion projects that have decades worth of influence to draw upon and implement, or use for inspiration in their new project. Octopath Traveler was immediately on my radar when it was announced due to the beautiful visual style of the game coupled with the fact it was a console quality JRPG. The young Square Soft fan that has been locked deep, deep inside of me and has slowly been losing faith in them really wanted this game to scratch the itch that they used to for me. To say that Square has finally put out a game that is everything I love about the genre and is one of the few games that takes newer gaming concepts that I thought I would never enjoy and makes them fun and appealing to me is a true pleasure in every way.

It’s that time of year again here at RF Generation, our annual PAIN YOURSELF WITH SUBMISSIONS CONTEST starts TOMORROW! Officially starting at 12:00 a.m. server time tonight, our contest will run though the entire month of August. As all of you know, member submissions are what keeps this site going and ensures that we have the most up-to-date and best video game database out there. To commemorate our anniversary, we hold this annual contest to see who can "contribute" the most value to the site during the allotted period of time (*see official rules and description of contributions and points below).

So, here’s how it works. From August 1st until August 31st, you make as many submissions as humanly possible. Our dedicated database staff will review the absurd amount of submissions, and at the end of it all, one of you gets a super sweet prize package, which includes your choice of $60 worth of gaming goodness. Essentially, you win a shopping spree (not to exceed $60 and items have to be game related) on GameGavel, eBay, or Amazon, and we pick up the tab. Of course, you’ll also be the coolest kid in town as you strut around in your new, official RF Generation Ringer T-shirt!